Malaria is a disease caused by Plasmodium parasites, which is transmitted thought the bites of infected mosquitos. Each year, an estimated 214 million people are infected with malaria, causing approximately 438,000 deaths – mostly children under the age of five.

Malaria is particularly devastating in Africa, where it is a leading killer of children. In fact, there are 10 new cases of malaria every second. Every 2 minutes, a child in Africa dies from a malaria infection and 90% of all malaria deaths occur in the region.  When combined with HIV/AIDS, malaria is even more deadly, particularly for pregnant women and children.

Approximately 3.2 billion people are at risk of malaria. In 2015, there were an estimated 214 million malaria cases.. Young children, pregnant women and non-immune travelers from malaria-free areas are particularly vulnerable to the disease when they become infected.
Africa accounted for most global cases of malaria (88%), followed by South-East Asia (10%) and the Eastern Mediterranean region (2%).
In 2015, there were an estimated 438,000 malaria deaths worldwide. Most of these deaths occurred in Africa Region (90%), followed by South-East Asia (7%) and the Eastern Mediterranean region (2%).
In areas with high transmission of malaria, children under 5 are particularly susceptible to infection, illness and death. More than two thirds (70%) of all malaria deaths occur in this age group. In 2015, about 305,000 African children died before their fifth birthdays.